Question:

what two example of commensalism in animals and plants

by Guest11133101  |  5 years, 2 month(s) ago

3 LIKES UnLike

what two example of commensalism in animals and plants

 Tags: animals, commensalism, example, plants

   Report

19 ANSWERS

  1. Guest24299934

    ughhhhh whats that thing in the sea snemone that hurts other fish accept the clownfish.......?

  2. Guest24260895

    Help Me give me more example my teacher giving us 10 examples!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

     

  3. Guest22707842

    luklnhjbnuibnhjbnhjn

  4. Guest22608540

    shark and those fish that stick to its bottom

  5. Guest21749533

    hey does anyone know some examples of commensalism aside from the barnacles? that's our homework,men it's freaking me out

     

     

     

     

     

  6. Guest20965680
    uyykhjmhgmhjmkrdieiktfikrkf yyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyoooooooooooooooooooouuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuurrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr ffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaccccccccccccccccccccccceeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
  7. Guest20755337
    mangrove as a fish nest
  8. Guest20076431
    ewan a*s. nga namin yan ngayon ehhhhh. from; VI agoncillo mayamot elem school antipolo city
  9. Guest15140604
    A good example is when a barnicle attaches onto a whales tale. The barnical gets transported to a new scorce for food and the whale just takes it there, without realizing what it is on. So, yeah.
  10. Guest14106309
    I have biology homework and I need one good example of commensalism. Anyone know one?
  11. Guest13309197
    duuuuuude
  12. Guest12690204
    what do birds commensalism off of
  13. Ali Abdullah
    Hi, A = Alelopathy Alelopathy is when one plant releases chemicals which cause certain other plants around it to grow slowly. C = Commensalism A relationship between two organisms where one species is helped, but the other is unaffected. Example: The Northern Hog Sucker is a fish that turns over stones looking for food. Smaller fish follow the sucker to grab whatever it misses. D = Dispersal This could be a type of Mutualism or Commensalism. Dispersal means "to spread." Sometimes, after they eat part of a plant, animals help the plant by spreading its seeds. They do the same for fungi, except they spread spores instead of seeds. Example 1: A Blue Jay eats acorns from oak trees. Sometimes it flies off with an acorn and buries it so it can eat it later. If the bird forgets about it, the acorn can grow into a new tree. Example 2: A Red Fox eats some wild grapes. Later, the fox poops out some seeds, which grow into new grape vines. Example 3: A fly lands on a mushroom and eats some of it. While it eats, some of the mushroom's spores stick to the fly. When the fly dies, the spores are in a new place and can grow into new mushrooms. Example 4 (Commensalism): Water birds, such as ducks or herons, carry mud on their feet from one body of water to another. Tiny organisms in the mud, such as algae or amoebas, get transported in the mud to a new place. The birds don't get helped, so it's not Mutualism. Thanks
  14. Guest12238602
    hihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihhihihiihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihih
  15. crystaldove
    1.barnacles attaching to whales. 2.fish that use anemones for shelter and protection. 3.epiphytes like orchids & ferns on larger plants. 4.other epiphytes like lichens,mosses & liverworths on trees. 5.sea anaemone on upper case of hermit crab
  16. Guest11781326
    Barnacles adhering to the skin of a whale or shell of a mollusk. The barnacle benefits by finding a habitat where food is available. Whale receives nothing
  17. Guest11485797
    frog and bromeliad frog gets water and shelter from the bromeliad but the bromeliad receives nothing
  18. Guest11379440
    I DON'T KNOW!
  19. Ali Abdullah
    Hi, A = Alelopathy Alelopathy is when one plant releases chemicals which cause certain other plants around it to grow slowly. C = Commensalism A relationship between two organisms where one species is helped, but the other is unaffected. Example: The Northern Hog Sucker is a fish that turns over stones looking for food. Smaller fish follow the sucker to grab whatever it misses. D = Dispersal This could be a type of Mutualism or Commensalism. Dispersal means "to spread." Sometimes, after they eat part of a plant, animals help the plant by spreading its seeds. They do the same for fungi, except they spread spores instead of seeds. Example 1: A Blue Jay eats acorns from oak trees. Sometimes it flies off with an acorn and buries it so it can eat it later. If the bird forgets about it, the acorn can grow into a new tree. Example 2: A Red Fox eats some wild grapes. Later, the fox poops out some seeds, which grow into new grape vines. Example 3: A fly lands on a mushroom and eats some of it. While it eats, some of the mushroom's spores stick to the fly. When the fly dies, the spores are in a new place and can grow into new mushrooms. Example 4 (Commensalism): Water birds, such as ducks or herons, carry mud on their feet from one body of water to another. Tiny organisms in the mud, such as algae or amoebas, get transported in the mud to a new place. The birds don't get helped, so it's not Mutualism. Thanks

Question Stats

Latest activity: 3 years, 1 month(s) ago.
This question has been viewed 6845 times and has 19 answers.

2 People are following this question

Arslan Masaudmfrog27

BECOME A GUIDE

Share your knowledge and help people by answering questions.