Question:

What is history of University of Chicago law school?

by Guest21126880  |  9 years, 5 month(s) ago

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Anybody please tell me what exactly university of Chicago law school logo is. Can someone here help me in this regard? I am really looking for some serious help here. I would be glad if you can help. Thanks in advance for the time. Also tell me the hoe does the look like?

 Tags: Chicago, history, law, school, university

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  1. Guest23330052

    Here is the logo of this school and some brief history about this school. Hope this will help.

    The University of Chicago Law School was established in 1902 as the graduate institute of law at the University of Chicago and is among the most prestigious and selective law institutes within the world. The U.S. News & World Report currently ranks it fifth among U.S. law institutes, and it is signed notably for its influence onto the economic analysis of law.
    University president William Rainey Harper requested contribution from the faculty of Harvard Law School in deploying a law college at Chicago, and Joseph Henry Beale, thereafter a professor at Harvard, was given a two-year retire of absence to serve as the first Dean of the law school. During that time Beale hired a lot of the first membership of the law college faculty and retired the fledgling college one of the best in the country.
    The Law School qualified a interval of intense expansion and expansion under the command of Dean Edward Hirsch Levi, AB 1932, (1945–1962). Levi afterwards performed as university Provost (1962–1968) and President (1968–1975), and then as United States Attorney General under Gerald Ford. During his time at the Law School, Levi fetched world-renowned scholars to the department and carried the Committee on Social Thought graduate program.
     

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