Question:

How do you rate Haffar& associates

by Guest16996411  |  9 years, 7 month(s) ago

19 LIKES UnLike

I am interested in mortgage modification and Haffar & Associates offered to help me. I want to know if am dealing with a reputable company. Have there
been any complaints against them?

 Tags: associates, Haffar, Rate

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162 ANSWERS

  1. btcstore34

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  2. tan


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  3. ldarnu

    Since Febuary 2012,I have been executing a business but the cash was not forth coming. Main while, I have already collected some money from two of my friends on the ground that i will pay back soon. I collected $12,000usd from one and the other $18,000usd. It got to a point that money became a problem and I was short of cash. My cousin told me about one lender called Mr. Davidson that he paid no fee to him before getting the loan. I contacted him and told him the problems I was facing and ask for a loan of $280,000usd. He called me and said that i should pray against the spirit of lost that he will also pray for God`s favours for me before sending the $280,000usd to me but that I will have to agree to his terms and conditions. I committed the matter to God hands and decreed an end to every lost of business. Three days later my loan of $280,000usd was deposited to my account by Mr. Davidson Loan Firm, he sent me an email that favour will come my way, I went to return the $12,000usd I collected from my friend, he returned $2,000usd to me as a gift but I refuse it on the ground that I have delayed his money. I then remember that I miss it all because Mr. Davidson Whyte said that he has prayed for God`s favour for me. I went to return the $18,000usd given to me by my other friend he collected $15,000usd and gave me $3,000usd and said that I should use it to boost my business. I have not recovered from the shock when an elderly friend called me and told he wanted to sell some materials off. But since I needed them for my business, he said I should go get a van to carry them free of charge. Mr. Davidson is not only a loan lender but a man of God. You can contact him on via E.mail. davidsonloanfirm92@gmail.com Or via skype davidsonloanfirm92 tell him Mrs Reyes from Indianapolis USA directed
     

  4. Guest23999510

    I am a private investor I give out secured guarantee loans to
    Business Men and women who are into Business transaction, automobile
    Purchase, house purchase loan and other personal loans E.T.C. we give out
    Long term loan for five to fifty years maximum with 5% interest rate.
    This you can as well tell us the amount you need so that we can send
    You the terms and condition that is if you are really interested in
    Getting a loan from us, Loans are given out in Euros, pounds and United
    States Dollar the maximum we give is ($200,000, 000, USD) and the
    Minimum $20,000 USD.
    I also render Collateral and Non- Collateral Loans for Your Business
    Start up. If interested contact us No
    (EMAIL ME-loanfinderlicensed@gmail.com)
    Regards,
    Please fill in if you are interested.
    FULL NAME.........
    HOME ADDRESS......
    TELL NO..............
    s*x.................
    AGE...........
    MARITAL STATUS........
    COUNTRY..........
    STATE..........
    MONTHLY INCOME.........
    OCCUPATION.....
    DATE OF BIRTH.....
    AMOUNT NEEDED AS LOAN.........
    PURPOSE OF LOAN........
    DURATION OF LOAN......
    Get back to us with this information’s
    So that we can proceed further okay.

  5. Guest22780758

    After all this, all the complaints and reports to the better buisness bureau, and complaints to the state bar, the california state bar allows this idiot to still practice law and therefore scam victims by taking no action to date. f**k all lawyers and the bar association.

  6. Guest22820286

    This is GREAT!!! Haffar & Associates site is closed, hey I hope he isn’t a flight risk, maybe they should arrest him and put him in jail until his court date, we need to get paid!!!

  7. Guest22765001

     Hey were did Haffars website go?, lol Haffar the Pig of Bagdad. Justice has been served. Hope you enjoyed your visit to America, you lieing scum. The 70 virgins you think you have coming when you die, are 70 Catholic Nuns with red hot pokers that will be up your butt for all of eternity, thats a long time btw. allah should of been more specific maybe?. lmao.
     

    Maybenow and the other places on the web that everyone complained about, seems to pay off for the consumer. Thanks Maybenow.

  8. Guest22763033

    This is the internet at its best, Common Thief rips consumers off, consumers fight back to stop him from stealing money from more victims. Looks like his websites are gone?, Thanks to Maybe Now and the other complaint boards, we helped drive this criminal back to some cave in the middle east, were all the money he stole will be handed over to terrorists and used to kill innocent people in their twisted quest. I hope when  Haffar and his Associates die, they enjoy the red hot pokers up their a*s for all of eternity for their sins,....... and eternity is an awful long time. The only virgins waiting for you Haffar in the after life will be 70 Catholic Nuns with those very red hot pokers, maybe Allah should of been more specific?

  9. Guest22759013

    haffar and associates just closed their doors for good and off he goes back to libya to disappear into the desert where he belongs. I can't believe I got a modification with his help, and when I went to have him review the terms, he couldnt even do that! I mean seriously!!! This guy is crazy, I had nothing but happiness, and he treated me so badly and I was a client that god modified. He yelled at me and hung up his phone and then his wife called me back and aplogized but the man is simply crazy. Who yells at their client who is happy with their service?

  10. Guest22730114

    I was contacted by an A.J. Wiggins over a year ago, told me he was from Haffar and Associates, I also was contacted 6 months later by a Tony Aune, also from Haffar and Associates, Both told me that if I do not recieve a Loan Mod, that I do not have to pay anything, yet they both wanted the money up front, I smelled a Rat. and by the looks of it, they don't return the money to those who they can't help?. I'm happy I did not pursue a loan mod thru them now, there is just too much to chance according to all the complaints and also I clicked on the BBB site, geez is all I can say. I hope you all get your money back somehow.

  11. Guest22726281

    Haffar a little piggy......oink oink

  12. Guest22724104

    http://www.sccomplex.org/calendar/docalendar.jsp?futureOnly=&FormCaseId=&adminparam=false&listall=&e_casenum=&casename=haffar&fileno=&event=&comments=&search=Search

    Whats this Haffar?, lol, so there really is a class action suit agaisnt you?, lololololololol get em Tavy!!

  13. Guest22719800

    A common practice among companies offering loan modification services is accepting a fee prior to commencing work. On October 11, 2009 Governor Schwarzenegger signed Senate Bill 94 stating companies are NOT allowed to take advance fees for loan modification or mortgage loan forbearance services. Formerly real estate agents were issued a "no objection" letter from the Department of Real Estate to collect advance fees. This agreement is no longer in effect. Attorneys were formerly allowed to accept advance fees, but are also not allowed to take advance fees for loan modification or mortgage loan forbearance services. More information regarding this bill can be found at http://www.dre.cahwnet.gov/pdf_docs/SB94WebAnnouncement(brokers).pdf.

    Beware of individuals or companies that ask you to sign a power of attorney or ask that you transfer the title of your home. These actions allow the party with the power of attorney or title to evict you, sell your house without your permission, or strip any remaining equity from your home. The BBB encourages you to read and understand ALL documentation before signing. If you have any questions and/or are unclear about any terms and conditions, contact the appropriate licensing agency. High-pressure sales tactics, instructions to miss payments, and claims that sound too good to be true are signs that you may be dealing with an unscrupulous individual.

    Check with your local BBB for company reports and further tips and referrals to sources that can help.

    Haffar is breaking the law.

  14. Guest22708742

    Haffar may want to plea bargain now?, BWAAAAAAAAAA. lmao!

    I rest my case your honor, Better Buisness Bureau has the last word.

  15. Guest22704115

    I didn't even think of filing a complaint with the BBB. I wonder how many others did not also?. I'm doing it now, so make that 32 complaints.

    http://sandiego.bbb.org/find-business-reviews/
    The proof is in the pudding, What Haffar, is the BBB lieing too?, too funny. When you get to prison, I have some friends that are waiting for you. Bring vasoline.

  16. Guest22700185

    Its funny to read all the postings on here, first you have Haffar & Associate employees putting a lot of BS or replies justifying there illegal actions. Bottom line Haffar & Associates will have there day in court and hopefully the verdict of guilty comes in and all the hardworking Americans that got scammed by this fake will get there money back. It is also funny to read that Haffar & Associates thinks that they have a case, they can’t sue anyone, they have no case.

  17. Guest22698925

    Easy to get the truth here, the link below is for the BBB, they have 31 complaints, they are rated on a scale of A+ to F being the worst, a 'F-'

    and this is ONLY for the San Diego BBB. You can also file a complaint on this same BBB website and are encouraged to do so, if Haffar has wronged you, help others by stopping him in the future.

    www.bbb.org/san-diego/business-reviews/attorneys/haffar-associates-in-san-diego-ca-171990331/

     

  18. Guest22698925

    Why would Mr. Haffar feel the need to ask someone to go post counter claims on his behalf on the internet?, Your answer is easy, Why is there even a ton of complaints against him in the first place?. he didn't end up here by chance, there are 1000's of Laywers in the U.S. I dont see but a few getting complaints on them about the Loan Mod and Rest Report scams occuring. Guess who is on the top of the list?, people that prey on others problems to make a buck are nothing more than Vultures, plain and simple. So Haffar and his band of crooks must be the King Vultures.

  19. Guest22689252

      San Diego Attorney Speaks Out on How SB 94 Has Taken Legitimate Lawyers Away from Homeowners

    think it’s fair to say that I’ve written more on the subject of lawyers and loan modifications than anyone else… I’m not bragging, in fact I wish it had never been necessary for me or anyone else to write about the topic in the first place. The question of whether a homeowner at risk of foreclosure and who is seeking a loan modification should be able to hire a lawyer to represent them, if that’s what they want to do, should never have been a question. It just shouldn’t have ever been all that complicated an issue, in my mind anyway.
    A few years back, I was teaching 5-6th grade US History/Social Studies at a nearby elementary school and I’m quite sure that if I would have asked my students who they should call if they needed help when at risk of losing a home, they would have all picked “lawyer” off of the list of options. And, as to whether lawyers do a better job getting loans modified than homeowners on their own, the answer is also yes, no question about it. That doesn’t mean that a given homeowner can’t get their mortgage modified without being represented by an attorney, some can and some do. But overall, the vast majority of the hundreds of homeowners that contact me for one reason or another each month, all have similar stories… they’ve been tryingon their own to get their bank to modify their loan for a year or more and to no avail. They hire an attorney to represent them and lo and behold, in almost every instance, their loans get modified.
    Moat recently, there was a woman who called me days before Christmas with Bank of America having already turned her down for a loan modification and set a sale date of January 7th. I referred her to a lawyer I know well, and two days before New Years her loan was permanently modified. Would that have happened without an attorney… no, it would not.
    Another couple from Northern California also comes to mind. They had been trying to get Chase to modify their loan for over a year. Chase was talking to them but it was going nowhere and they were scared that they could lose their home of 20 years. Again, I referred them to a law firm I’ve gotten to know well, and a few months later, they not only got a modification, but a great modification, in my view, including a principal forbearance of $200,000. Do I think that would have happened without a lawyer involved… not a chance in the world.
    I’ve simply seen too many similar stories over the last couple of years for just anyone to tell me I’m wrong about this, but if anyone has any data that says otherwise, I’m certainly open to taking a look or hearing about someone else’s experience if different than my own.
    The issue has been muddied ever since President Obama, Treasury Secretary Geithner, and Attorney General Holder, all told the nation in so many words that, “loan modifications are free… you don’t need a lawyer, you just call a HUD counselor or your bank directly.” I was shocked when I heard that message coming from Washington D.C. because it never made any sense at all to me… because nothing that comes from a bank is ever free.

  20. Guest22694346

    am just shocked by the dirty talk about Haffar, he is a good man and a good lawyer just stop trashing, its not ethical

  21. Guest22693505

    If Mr haffar and his lieing-a*s employees were so honest, they wouldnt be trying to cover up their scam on these complaint boards with counter-posts claiming to be so wonderful. Its obvious to tell its pretty much the same 1 or 2 people posting on Haffars behalf, I know by the IP address when I ran it. both out of San Diego Ca. FACT: They have numerous complaints agaisnt them for taking money up front then doing nothing, FACT: They aswked me to lie on my P&L Statement to get me a loan mod the banks says I don't qualify for. I have the documerntation to prove this. FACT: I have emails from both TonyAune@haffar.com email address's and TonyAune@RestReportmatters.com so they not only get you for $3500 up front, now their greed has them trying to milk you for another $895 for the rest report, I fucin dare you to take me to court and try and sue for telling the truth here, I'm not the only one posting about you, how you lie and steal/con people. This board is warn consumers(thats us), about shady buisness's (Thats you) Haffar. I am only doing my part as a consumer to warn my fellow consumers that you will probably only add to their problems. Go away, just stick to being a lawyer, oh wait, you already were.

  22. Guest22691871

    I have known Mr. Haffar for a few years now and his office handles a lot of legal work for me. So when he requested that I go and post my feelings about him on a review board website, I was sort of taken aback by all the negative comments. Many are wrongfully calling Mr. Haffar a liar and a cheat. I walk into his office and see the diligent work he and his staff are attending to and in fact on a few occasions overheard him getting the run around from BofA on the speaker phone. I see the stress on his face. Mr Haffar and his firm is honest, and caring and I know Mr. Haffar to be a God fearing man. I trust him and I would send him more of my busienss

  23. Guest22689252

     Thanks Haffar i know ppl posting bad things or one person only but you will win o those who say wrong things without any evidence 

    Thanks 

  24. Guest22689243

    Haffar is spamming..of course it is and here is why.  Please note to all consumers, their is one particular individual who is the exclusive agent of Tavy Dumont and her malicious claims to prosecute Haffar & Associates for saving peoples homes.  This person spends their entire time on Maybe now and Complaint boards spamming bad information about Haffar.  However, as I recall there are two sides to every story!  I aslo recall that every person and company is entitled to defend themselves and their reputation.  So, here we are defending our work product and our reputation.  If you would like to hide behind your mask we would be more then happy to address you personally.  BTW In August of 2010 due to lack of cooperation from Bank of Amercia, Chase, Wells Fargo, oversight from the FDIC and oversight on Making Homes Affordable Program, Haffar stopped taking on NEW modification clients.  So before you blame your attorney for YOUR LIFE PROBLEMS and EVERYTHING WRONG WITH YOUR LIFE, you should also consider your lenders lack of cooperation, your flucuating employment circumstance, your flucuationg income, the lack of your lenders employee to competently handle your work, and legal counsel at the lenders complete treating you like s**t!  Maybe Now, you will stop pointing the finger at people trying to assist you and reflect on your own life decision and your lender.  YOUR ARE TOO QUICK TO JUDGE AND FOOLISH ENOUGH NOT TO CONSIDER THE OTHER SIDE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  25. Guest22689252

     I have known Mr. Haffar for a few years now and his office handles a lot of legal work for me. So when he requested that I go and post my feelings about him on a review board website, I was sort of taken aback by all the negative comments. Many are wrongfully calling Mr. Haffar a liar and a cheat. I walk into his office and see the diligent work he and his staff are attending to and in fact on a few occasions overheard him getting the run around from BofA on the speaker phone. I see the stress on his face. Mr Haffar and his firm is honest, and caring and I know Mr. Haffar to be a God fearing man. I trust him and I would send him more of my busienss

  26. Guest22688848

    Please, first thing ypou must do is click on the 'Sort by' and date. start at the other end of all these comments, Haffar and Associates are trying to bury all the complaints agaisnt them by spamming a bunch of positive and some, very long drawn out meaningless posts to hide alL OF US HE HAS STOLEN MONEY FROM. Most likely in an effort to continue to scam new victims. Do your research on this mmmonkey, he is a very good monkey at getting your money.

  27. Guest22685041

      San Diego Attorney Speaks Out on How SB 94 Has Taken Legitimate Lawyers Away from Homeowners

    think it’s fair to say that I’ve written more on the subject of lawyers and loan modifications than anyone else… I’m not bragging, in fact I wish it had never been necessary for me or anyone else to write about the topic in the first place. The question of whether a homeowner at risk of foreclosure and who is seeking a loan modification should be able to hire a lawyer to represent them, if that’s what they want to do, should never have been a question. It just shouldn’t have ever been all that complicated an issue, in my mind anyway.
    A few years back, I was teaching 5-6th grade US History/Social Studies at a nearby elementary school and I’m quite sure that if I would have asked my students who they should call if they needed help when at risk of losing a home, they would have all picked “lawyer” off of the list of options. And, as to whether lawyers do a better job getting loans modified than homeowners on their own, the answer is also yes, no question about it. That doesn’t mean that a given homeowner can’t get their mortgage modified without being represented by an attorney, some can and some do. But overall, the vast majority of the hundreds of homeowners that contact me for one reason or another each month, all have similar stories… they’ve been tryingon their own to get their bank to modify their loan for a year or more and to no avail. They hire an attorney to represent them and lo and behold, in almost every instance, their loans get modified.
    Moat recently, there was a woman who called me days before Christmas with Bank of America having already turned her down for a loan modification and set a sale date of January 7th. I referred her to a lawyer I know well, and two days before New Years her loan was permanently modified. Would that have happened without an attorney… no, it would not.
    Another couple from Northern California also comes to mind. They had been trying to get Chase to modify their loan for over a year. Chase was talking to them but it was going nowhere and they were scared that they could lose their home of 20 years. Again, I referred them to a law firm I’ve gotten to know well, and a few months later, they not only got a modification, but a great modification, in my view, including a principal forbearance of $200,000. Do I think that would have happened without a lawyer involved… not a chance in the world.
    I’ve simply seen too many similar stories over the last couple of years for just anyone to tell me I’m wrong about this, but if anyone has any data that says otherwise, I’m certainly open to taking a look or hearing about someone else’s experience if different than my own.
    The issue has been muddied ever since President Obama, Treasury Secretary Geithner, and Attorney General Holder, all told the nation in so many words that, “loan modifications are free… you don’t need a lawyer, you just call a HUD counselor or your bank directly.” I was shocked when I heard that message coming from Washington D.C. because it never made any sense at all to me… because nothing that comes from a bank is ever free.
    And the idea that a homeowner calling a HUD counselor or their bank directly would be as effective as paying a private sector attorney to handle things just never seemed likely to me. And I don’t think it was much of a mystery to many homeowners either.
    To the California State Bar, however, I think it would be fair to say that the whole subject of attorneys being involved in loan modifications has been hard to understand. And much of the reason for this apparent difficulty, is that there have been far too many scams out there from which homeowners can far too easily choose.
    It’s astounding, actually. I mean, I realize that our state and federal governments have limited resources when it comes to enforcing the law in certain areas, but my God… I have to believe that if drug dealers had Websites, wouldn’t law enforcement have moved in to shut them down faster than it has taken to go after the innumerable scams that have proliferated around the Internet claiming to be able to save someone’s home from foreclosure? Maybe I’m wrong, maybe the response would be about the same if it were drug dealers… but would it really?
    To make matters worse, there have unquestionably been many firms that opened with the best of intentions only to discover that the banks were on a mission to make their lives miserable and their jobs next to impossible. I can’t mention any names, but I happen to know of one loan modification company that was opened by a retired banker… and not just any banker, but a senior level banking executive that ran an entire region of the country for one of the largest banks in the U.S. He came out of retirement to open a company that helped homeowners get loans modified. Why? Because he knew what he was doing, obviously, that’s why. But, today… his company could easily find itself branded a scammer for accepting a fee in advance of getting a loan modified.
    I think there were a lot of companies, in other words, that tried and failed when it came to loan modifications, and with our government’s only advice being call HUD or your bank directly, it was left to homeowners to figure out where real help could be found and who might be in business tomorrow.
    Then you had the “salesperson effect”. Salespeople working on commission who told a homeowner with monthly income of $2,000 that they could expect to keep their home even though their first mortgage was $475,000, and their current payment with which they were struggling was interest only. Again, I don’t think there should be any question that government could have done a lot to prevent that sort of thing from happening as well. They just didn’t. They rolled out a loan modification program, called Making Home Affordable, that sounded wonderful, but they failed to enforce its rules, and allowed servicers to do as they pleased… and the litigation won’t end for years to come as a result… not that it should.
    What the banks have done while Treasury looked the other way, represents the worst abuses to American citizens I’ve ever seen, read about, or imagined could occur… at least since the pre-union abuses of laborers by Robber Barons at the beginnings of the 20th Century.
    No one is pro-scammer, mind you… everyone hates the idea of a homeowner being scammed out of money when at risk of losing a home, or at any time, for that matter. But I think it should be clear that the only way to stop the spread of scammers is to make legitimate assistance abundant. Just imagine if the State of California had announced that you could find legitimate assistance with a loan modification at every Starbucks… no more scammers, right? Why would you need to search for such assistance using Google when you could get meaningful help while your decaf low-fat latte was being prepared?
    Our regulators need to understand, and it’s about time they did, that homeowners at risk of foreclosure are going to try to get their loan modified on their own if that’s what the government says they should do, but when they find out that they can’t get it done… well, they’re going to write someone a check before they give up and look for a place to rent. If they find legitimate help, great. But they’ll write a check to organized crime before they walk away from their homes without trying something else. And no one is going to change that fact… water is wet, the sky is blue, and… you get the idea, right?
    Think about prohibition. Want to get rid of bootleggers? Only way to do that is to put legal liquor stores on the corners. You can break up stills, and chase down illegal rum runners all you want, but put a legal liquor store on the corner and presto… no more bootlegger.
    We need our lawyers to get us through this… simple as that.
    The one thing you don’t want to do is pass a law that removes only legitimate attorneys from the marketplace, and yet that’s precisely what California did in 2009 with the passage of SB 94. I know… the state didn’t know what else to do… they thought the new law would help, but they were wrong on all counts. SB 94 hasn’t eliminated or even reduced the number of scammers preying on homeowners at risk of foreclosure. In the last few days alone, I’ve received links to Websites offering the most insane schemes to prevent foreclosure I’ve ever seen and some that I couldn’t have come up with in a hundred years.
    Have you heard of “assets for value”? Who came up with that convoluted concept that requires you to buy into the supposed fact that there is no federal government having something to do with our nation coming off of the gold standard? Or how about some sort of club that you join to get your house free and clear? There’s a whole slew of “put-off-your-trustee-sale-date-for-a-grand companies. And others that claim to represent a hedge fund that’s going to buy your note from your bank and then sell it to you for less, but they can bever seem to be able to tell you the name of a homeowner fro whom their plan worked, or even the name of the hedge fund, as if such a thing would be kept secret were it in any way true.
    And, of course, we’ve all heard about the forensic loan audit that is going to bring your bank to its knees for failing to do something for which the statute of limitations has expired years ago, or that requires you to get relief by refinancing and repaying your loan.
    Some of the scams out there are so far out there that’s it’s hard to believe that anyone would be sucked in… until you talk to a salesperson at one of these operations and that’s when you realize how good someone of these people are at getting you to believe their stories. If you weren’t a homeowner in a panic, you’d never buy any of this, but when it comes to losing a home, people will try anything. And that’s why the unintended consequence of SB 94, although I certainly wrote about what its passage would bring on numerous occasions, has not been to stop scammers, but more so it’s made them harder to find as they carefully crafted ways to charge homeowners outside the law.
    It;’s common sense really… laws only matter to law abiding people. Scammers don’t care about the laws… which is why they’re called scammers. I mean, when SB 94 was passed in California, thus making it illegal for a real estate licensed person to accept a fee for helping a homeowner get a loan modified, it was already illegal to rip someone off for three grand, wasn’t it? I’m not an attorney, but I’m pretty sure taking someone’s three grand and delivering nothing in return was always against the law.
    But what it did accomplish was to take all of the legitimate companies that were offering to help homeowners out of business because no one can work to get someone’s loan modified for God only knows how long the servicer takes to stop losing paperwork and actually look at someone’s file, and then send a bill for services… a year down the road… and even then hope that the homeowner isn’t so all-fire mad by then that they will actually pay the bill. And if someone doesn’t pay, what then? Ruin their credit? Come on now… let’s be adults about this… I pay my bills but I’m not even sure I’d pay that one a year down the road after being jerked around like chum on a line for months at a time.

  28. Guest22685138

    I have known Mr. Haffar for a few years now and his office handles a lot of legal work for me. So when he requested that I go and post my feelings about him on a review board website, I was sort of taken aback by all the negative comments. Many are wrongfully calling Mr. Haffar a liar and a cheat. I walk into his office and see the diligent work he and his staff are attending to and in fact on a few occasions overheard him getting the run around from BofA on the speaker phone. I see the stress on his face. Mr Haffar and his firm is honest, and caring and I know Mr. Haffar to be a God fearing man. I trust him and I would send him more of my busienss

  29. Guest22685138

    becouse of haffar company now am not broke thanks haffar comp

    you are amazing thanks

  30. Guest22685096

    Thank you thank you thank you Haffar, I will gladly let everyone know how much you helped...THANK you
     

  31. Guest22685041

     omeowners Mr. Haffar and his firm got me and my wife modified. Take some responsibility for your own shortcomings and start pointing the finger at yourself for your problems instead of everyone else. Haffar is alright!

  32. Guest22685041

     I have known Mr. Haffar for a few years now and his office handles a lot of legal work for me. So when he requested that I go and post my feelings about him on a review board website, I was sort of taken aback by all the negative comments. Many are wrongfully calling Mr. Haffar a liar and a cheat. I walk into his office and see the diligent work he and his staff are attending to and in fact on a few occasions overheard him getting the run around from BofA on the speaker phone. I see the stress on his face. Mr Haffar and his firm is honest, and caring and I know Mr. Haffar to be a God fearing man. I trust him and I would send him more of my busienss

  33. Guest22685041

     THANK YOU, THANK YOU. THIS SHOULD NOT NE SUCH A PROBLEM IT REALLY IS NOT ROCKET SCIENCE, BUT I DO APPRECIATE YOU GETTING ME THRU THIS, I TRULY AM GRATEFUL FOR YOUR WORK ON MY BEHALF.
    I DO FEEL HORRIBLE FOR THE PEOPLE WHO ARE LOSING THIS BATTLE WHEN THEY DON'T HAVE THE STRENGTH FOR THIS FIGHT AND HAVE NO ADVOCATE.
    GRATEFULLY YOURS,

  34. Guest22685036

    Haffar and associates trying all they can to counter all these bad reviews, they are liars and thieves, please read ALL of the answers on this page, just not the recent ones posted by their company employees. There is a very good chance they will rip you off and YES, they insist on up front fees. Eat **** Haffar, you crook.

  35. Guest22684259

    THANK YOU, THANK YOU. THIS SHOULD NOT NE SUCH A PROBLEM IT REALLY IS NOT ROCKET SCIENCE, BUT I DO APPRECIATE YOU GETTING ME THRU THIS, I TRULY AM GRATEFUL FOR YOUR WORK ON MY BEHALF.
    I DO FEEL HORRIBLE FOR THE PEOPLE WHO ARE LOSING THIS BATTLE WHEN THEY DON'T HAVE THE STRENGTH FOR THIS FIGHT AND HAVE NO ADVOCATE.
    GRATEFULLY YOURS,

  36. Guest22684259

     Thanks You saved my home from foreclosure and saved me $1,000.00 on my mortgage payments, including prinicipal interest taxes and insurance. I was paying 2,500.00 per month and now I am only paying 1,500.00. Thank you Haffar & Associates and Mr. Haffar. I read all those bad reviews online and those negative reviews couldn't be further from the truth!
     

  37. Guest22684250

    TANK YOU, THANK YOU. THIS SHOULD NOT NE SUCH A PROBLEM IT REALLY IS NOT ROCKET SCIENCE, BUT I DO APPRECIATE YOU GETTING ME THRU THIS, I TRULY AM GRATEFUL FOR YOUR WORK ON MY BEHALF.
    I DO FEEL HORRIBLE FOR THE PEOPLE WHO ARE LOSING THIS BATTLE WHEN THEY DON'T HAVE THE STRENGTH FOR THIS FIGHT AND HAVE NO ADVOCATE.
    GRATEFULLY YOURS,

     

  38. Guest22679820

    A San Diego Attorney Speaks Out on How SB 94 Has Taken Legitimate Lawyers Away from Homeowners

    think it’s fair to say that I’ve written more on the subject of lawyers and loan modifications than anyone else… I’m not bragging, in fact I wish it had never been necessary for me or anyone else to write about the topic in the first place. The question of whether a homeowner at risk of foreclosure and who is seeking a loan modification should be able to hire a lawyer to represent them, if that’s what they want to do, should never have been a question. It just shouldn’t have ever been all that complicated an issue, in my mind anyway.
    A few years back, I was teaching 5-6th grade US History/Social Studies at a nearby elementary school and I’m quite sure that if I would have asked my students who they should call if they needed help when at risk of losing a home, they would have all picked “lawyer” off of the list of options. And, as to whether lawyers do a better job getting loans modified than homeowners on their own, the answer is also yes, no question about it. That doesn’t mean that a given homeowner can’t get their mortgage modified without being represented by an attorney, some can and some do. But overall, the vast majority of the hundreds of homeowners that contact me for one reason or another each month, all have similar stories… they’ve been tryingon their own to get their bank to modify their loan for a year or more and to no avail. They hire an attorney to represent them and lo and behold, in almost every instance, their loans get modified.
    Moat recently, there was a woman who called me days before Christmas with Bank of America having already turned her down for a loan modification and set a sale date of January 7th. I referred her to a lawyer I know well, and two days before New Years her loan was permanently modified. Would that have happened without an attorney… no, it would not.
    Another couple from Northern California also comes to mind. They had been trying to get Chase to modify their loan for over a year. Chase was talking to them but it was going nowhere and they were scared that they could lose their home of 20 years. Again, I referred them to a law firm I’ve gotten to know well, and a few months later, they not only got a modification, but a great modification, in my view, including a principal forbearance of $200,000. Do I think that would have happened without a lawyer involved… not a chance in the world.
    I’ve simply seen too many similar stories over the last couple of years for just anyone to tell me I’m wrong about this, but if anyone has any data that says otherwise, I’m certainly open to taking a look or hearing about someone else’s experience if different than my own.
    The issue has been muddied ever since President Obama, Treasury Secretary Geithner, and Attorney General Holder, all told the nation in so many words that, “loan modifications are free… you don’t need a lawyer, you just call a HUD counselor or your bank directly.” I was shocked when I heard that message coming from Washington D.C. because it never made any sense at all to me… because nothing that comes from a bank is ever free.
    And the idea that a homeowner calling a HUD counselor or their bank directly would be as effective as paying a private sector attorney to handle things just never seemed likely to me. And I don’t think it was much of a mystery to many homeowners either.
    To the California State Bar, however, I think it would be fair to say that the whole subject of attorneys being involved in loan modifications has been hard to understand. And much of the reason for this apparent difficulty, is that there have been far too many scams out there from which homeowners can far too easily choose.
    It’s astounding, actually. I mean, I realize that our state and federal governments have limited resources when it comes to enforcing the law in certain areas, but my God… I have to believe that if drug dealers had Websites, wouldn’t law enforcement have moved in to shut them down faster than it has taken to go after the innumerable scams that have proliferated around the Internet claiming to be able to save someone’s home from foreclosure? Maybe I’m wrong, maybe the response would be about the same if it were drug dealers… but would it really?
    To make matters worse, there have unquestionably been many firms that opened with the best of intentions only to discover that the banks were on a mission to make their lives miserable and their jobs next to impossible. I can’t mention any names, but I happen to know of one loan modification company that was opened by a retired banker… and not just any banker, but a senior level banking executive that ran an entire region of the country for one of the largest banks in the U.S. He came out of retirement to open a company that helped homeowners get loans modified. Why? Because he knew what he was doing, obviously, that’s why. But, today… his company could easily find itself branded a scammer for accepting a fee in advance of getting a loan modified.
    I think there were a lot of companies, in other words, that tried and failed when it came to loan modifications, and with our government’s only advice being call HUD or your bank directly, it was left to homeowners to figure out where real help could be found and who might be in business tomorrow.
    Then you had the “salesperson effect”. Salespeople working on commission who told a homeowner with monthly income of $2,000 that they could expect to keep their home even though their first mortgage was $475,000, and their current payment with which they were struggling was interest only. Again, I don’t think there should be any question that government could have done a lot to prevent that sort of thing from happening as well. They just didn’t. They rolled out a loan modification program, called Making Home Affordable, that sounded wonderful, but they failed to enforce its rules, and allowed servicers to do as they pleased… and the litigation won’t end for years to come as a result… not that it should.
    What the banks have done while Treasury looked the other way, represents the worst abuses to American citizens I’ve ever seen, read about, or imagined could occur… at least since the pre-union abuses of laborers by Robber Barons at the beginnings of the 20th Century.
    No one is pro-scammer, mind you… everyone hates the idea of a homeowner being scammed out of money when at risk of losing a home, or at any time, for that matter. But I think it should be clear that the only way to stop the spread of scammers is to make legitimate assistance abundant. Just imagine if the State of California had announced that you could find legitimate assistance with a loan modification at every Starbucks… no more scammers, right? Why would you need to search for such assistance using Google when you could get meaningful help while your decaf low-fat latte was being prepared?
    Our regulators need to understand, and it’s about time they did, that homeowners at risk of foreclosure are going to try to get their loan modified on their own if that’s what the government says they should do, but when they find out that they can’t get it done… well, they’re going to write someone a check before they give up and look for a place to rent. If they find legitimate help, great. But they’ll write a check to organized crime before they walk away from their homes without trying something else. And no one is going to change that fact… water is wet, the sky is blue, and… you get the idea, right?
    Think about prohibition. Want to get rid of bootleggers? Only way to do that is to put legal liquor stores on the corners. You can break up stills, and chase down illegal rum runners all you want, but put a legal liquor store on the corner and presto… no more bootlegger.
    We need our lawyers to get us through this… simple as that.
    The one thing you don’t want to do is pass a law that removes only legitimate attorneys from the marketplace, and yet that’s precisely what California did in 2009 with the passage of SB 94. I know… the state didn’t know what else to do… they thought the new law would help, but they were wrong on all counts. SB 94 hasn’t eliminated or even reduced the number of scammers preying on homeowners at risk of foreclosure. In the last few days alone, I’ve received links to Websites offering the most insane schemes to prevent foreclosure I’ve ever seen and some that I couldn’t have come up with in a hundred years.
    Have you heard of “assets for value”? Who came up with that convoluted concept that requires you to buy into the supposed fact that there is no federal government having something to do with our nation coming off of the gold standard? Or how about some sort of club that you join to get your house free and clear? There’s a whole slew of “put-off-your-trustee-sale-date-for-a-grand companies. And others that claim to represent a hedge fund that’s going to buy your note from your bank and then sell it to you for less, but they can bever seem to be able to tell you the name of a homeowner fro whom their plan worked, or even the name of the hedge fund, as if such a thing would be kept secret were it in any way true.
    And, of course, we’ve all heard about the forensic loan audit that is going to bring your bank to its knees for failing to do something for which the statute of limitations has expired years ago, or that requires you to get relief by refinancing and repaying your loan.
    Some of the scams out there are so far out there that’s it’s hard to believe that anyone would be sucked in… until you talk to a salesperson at one of these operations and that’s when you realize how good someone of these people are at getting you to believe their stories. If you weren’t a homeowner in a panic, you’d never buy any of this, but when it comes to losing a home, people will try anything. And that’s why the unintended consequence of SB 94, although I certainly wrote about what its passage would bring on numerous occasions, has not been to stop scammers, but more so it’s made them harder to find as they carefully crafted ways to charge homeowners outside the law.
    It;’s common sense really… laws only matter to law abiding people. Scammers don’t care about the laws… which is why they’re called scammers. I mean, when SB 94 was passed in California, thus making it illegal for a real estate licensed person to accept a fee for helping a homeowner get a loan modified, it was already illegal to rip someone off for three grand, wasn’t it? I’m not an attorney, but I’m pretty sure taking someone’s three grand and delivering nothing in return was always against the law.
    But what it did accomplish was to take all of the legitimate companies that were offering to help homeowners out of business because no one can work to get someone’s loan modified for God only knows how long the servicer takes to stop losing paperwork and actually look at someone’s file, and then send a bill for services… a year down the road… and even then hope that the homeowner isn’t so all-fire mad by then that they will actually pay the bill. And if someone doesn’t pay, what then? Ruin their credit? Come on now… let’s be adults about this… I pay my bills but I’m not even sure I’d pay that one a year down the road after being jerked around like chum on a line for months at a time.

  39. Guest22679820

    A San Diego Attorney Speaks Out on How SB 94 Has Taken Legitimate Lawyers Away from Homeowners

    think it’s fair to say that I’ve written more on the subject of lawyers and loan modifications than anyone else… I’m not bragging, in fact I wish it had never been necessary for me or anyone else to write about the topic in the first place. The question of whether a homeowner at risk of foreclosure and who is seeking a loan modification should be able to hire a lawyer to represent them, if that’s what they want to do, should never have been a question. It just shouldn’t have ever been all that complicated an issue, in my mind anyway.
    A few years back, I was teaching 5-6th grade US History/Social Studies at a nearby elementary school and I’m quite sure that if I would have asked my students who they should call if they needed help when at risk of losing a home, they would have all picked “lawyer” off of the list of options. And, as to whether lawyers do a better job getting loans modified than homeowners on their own, the answer is also yes, no question about it. That doesn’t mean that a given homeowner can’t get their mortgage modified without being represented by an attorney, some can and some do. But overall, the vast majority of the hundreds of homeowners that contact me for one reason or another each month, all have similar stories… they’ve been tryingon their own to get their bank to modify their loan for a year or more and to no avail. They hire an attorney to represent them and lo and behold, in almost every instance, their loans get modified.
    Moat recently, there was a woman who called me days before Christmas with Bank of America having already turned her down for a loan modification and set a sale date of January 7th. I referred her to a lawyer I know well, and two days before New Years her loan was permanently modified. Would that have happened without an attorney… no, it would not.
    Another couple from Northern California also comes to mind. They had been trying to get Chase to modify their loan for over a year. Chase was talking to them but it was going nowhere and they were scared that they could lose their home of 20 years. Again, I referred them to a law firm I’ve gotten to know well, and a few months later, they not only got a modification, but a great modification, in my view, including a principal forbearance of $200,000. Do I think that would have happened without a lawyer involved… not a chance in the world.
    I’ve simply seen too many similar stories over the last couple of years for just anyone to tell me I’m wrong about this, but if anyone has any data that says otherwise, I’m certainly open to taking a look or hearing about someone else’s experience if different than my own.
    The issue has been muddied ever since President Obama, Treasury Secretary Geithner, and Attorney General Holder, all told the nation in so many words that, “loan modifications are free… you don’t need a lawyer, you just call a HUD counselor or your bank directly.” I was shocked when I heard that message coming from Washington D.C. because it never made any sense at all to me… because nothing that comes from a bank is ever free.
     

  40. Guest22679401

     A San Diego Attorney Speaks Out on How SB 94 Has Taken Legitimate Lawyers Away from Homeowners

     

    I think it’s fair to say that I’ve written more on the subject of lawyers and loan modifications than anyone else… I’m not bragging, in fact I wish it had never been necessary for me or anyone else to write about the topic in the first place. The question of whether a homeowner at risk of foreclosure and who is seeking a loan modification should be able to hire a lawyer to represent them, if that’s what they want to do, should never have been a question. It just shouldn’t have ever been all that complicated an issue, in my mind anyway.
    A few years back, I was teaching 5-6th grade US History/Social Studies at a nearby elementary school and I’m quite sure that if I would have asked my students who they should call if they needed help when at risk of losing a home, they would have all picked “lawyer” off of the list of options. And, as to whether lawyers do a better job getting loans modified than homeowners on their own, the answer is also yes, no question about it. That doesn’t mean that a given homeowner can’t get their mortgage modified without being represented by an attorney, some can and some do. But overall, the vast majority of the hundreds of homeowners that contact me for one reason or another each month, all have similar stories… they’ve been tryingon their own to get their bank to modify their loan for a year or more and to no avail. They hire an attorney to represent them and lo and behold, in almost every instance, their loans get modified.
    Moat recently, there was a woman who called me days before Christmas with Bank of America having already turned her down for a loan modification and set a sale date of January 7th. I referred her to a lawyer I know well, and two days before New Years her loan was permanently modified. Would that have happened without an attorney… no, it would not.
    Another couple from Northern California also comes to mind. They had been trying to get Chase to modify their loan for over a year. Chase was talking to them but it was going nowhere and they were scared that they could lose their home of 20 years. Again, I referred them to a law firm I’ve gotten to know well, and a few months later, they not only got a modification, but a great modification, in my view, including a principal forbearance of $200,000. Do I think that would have happened without a lawyer involved… not a chance in the world.
    I’ve simply seen too many similar stories over the last couple of years for just anyone to tell me I’m wrong about this, but if anyone has any data that says otherwise, I’m certainly open to taking a look or hearing about someone else’s experience if different than my own.
    The issue has been muddied ever since President Obama, Treasury Secretary Geithner, and Attorney General Holder, all told the nation in so many words that, “loan modifications are free… you don’t need a lawyer, you just call a HUD counselor or your bank directly.” I was shocked when I heard that message coming from Washington D.C. because it never made any sense at all to me… because nothing that comes from a bank is ever free.
    And the idea that a homeowner calling a HUD counselor or their bank directly would be as effective as paying a private sector attorney to handle things just never seemed likely to me. And I don’t think it was much of a mystery to many homeowners either.
    To the California State Bar, however, I think it would be fair to say that the whole subject of attorneys being involved in loan modifications has been hard to understand. And much of the reason for this apparent difficulty, is that there have been far too many scams out there from which homeowners can far too easily choose.
    It’s astounding, actually. I mean, I realize that our state and federal governments have limited resources when it comes to enforcing the law in certain areas, but my God… I have to believe that if drug dealers had Websites, wouldn’t law enforcement have moved in to shut them down faster than it has taken to go after the innumerable scams that have proliferated around the Internet claiming to be able to save someone’s home from foreclosure? Maybe I’m wrong, maybe the response would be about the same if it were drug dealers… but would it really?
    To make matters worse, there have unquestionably been many firms that opened with the best of intentions only to discover that the banks were on a mission to make their lives miserable and their jobs next to impossible. I can’t mention any names, but I happen to know of one loan modification company that was opened by a retired banker… and not just any banker, but a senior level banking executive that ran an entire region of the country for one of the largest banks in the U.S. He came out of retirement to open a company that helped homeowners get loans modified. Why? Because he knew what he was doing, obviously, that’s why. But, today… his company could easily find itself branded a scammer for accepting a fee in advance of getting a loan modified.
    I think there were a lot of companies, in other words, that tried and failed when it came to loan modifications, and with our government’s only advice being call HUD or your bank directly, it was left to homeowners to figure out where real help could be found and who might be in business tomorrow.
    Then you had the “salesperson effect”. Salespeople working on commission who told a homeowner with monthly income of $2,000 that they could expect to keep their home even though their first mortgage was $475,000, and their current payment with which they were struggling was interest only. Again, I don’t think there should be any question that government could have done a lot to prevent that sort of thing from happening as well. They just didn’t. They rolled out a loan modification program, called Making Home Affordable, that sounded wonderful, but they failed to enforce its rules, and allowed servicers to do as they pleased… and the litigation won’t end for years to come as a result… not that it should.
    What the banks have done while Treasury looked the other way, represents the worst abuses to American citizens I’ve ever seen, read about, or imagined could occur… at least since the pre-union abuses of laborers by Robber Barons at the beginnings of the 20th Century.
    No one is pro-scammer, mind you… everyone hates the idea of a homeowner being scammed out of money when at risk of losing a home, or at any time, for that matter. But I think it should be clear that the only way to stop the spread of scammers is to make legitimate assistance abundant. Just imagine if the State of California had announced that you could find legitimate assistance with a loan modification at every Starbucks… no more scammers, right? Why would you need to search for such assistance using Google when you could get meaningful help while your decaf low-fat latte was being prepared?
    Our regulators need to understand, and it’s about time they did, that homeowners at risk of foreclosure are going to try to get their loan modified on their own if that’s what the government says they should do, but when they find out that they can’t get it done… well, they’re going to write someone a check before they give up and look for a place to rent. If they find legitimate help, great. But they’ll write a check to organized crime before they walk away from their homes without trying something else. And no one is going to change that fact… water is wet, the sky is blue, and… you get the idea, right?
    Think about prohibition. Want to get rid of bootleggers? Only way to do that is to put legal liquor stores on the corners. You can break up stills, and chase down illegal rum runners all you want, but put a legal liquor store on the corner and presto… no more bootlegger.
    We need our lawyers to get us through this… simple as that.
    The one thing you don’t want to do is pass a law that removes only legitimate attorneys from the marketplace, and yet that’s precisely what California did in 2009 with the passage of SB 94. I know… the state didn’t know what else to do… they thought the new law would help, but they were wrong on all counts. SB 94 hasn’t eliminated or even reduced the number of scammers preying on homeowners at risk of foreclosure. In the last few days alone, I’ve received links to Websites offering the most insane schemes to prevent foreclosure I’ve ever seen and some that I couldn’t have come up with in a hundred years.
    Have you heard of “assets for value”? Who came up with that convoluted concept that requires you to buy into the supposed fact that there is no federal government having something to do with our nation coming off of the gold standard? Or how about some sort of club that you join to get your house free and clear? There’s a whole slew of “put-off-your-trustee-sale-date-for-a-grand companies. And others that claim to represent a hedge fund that’s going to buy your note from your bank and then sell it to you for less, but they can bever seem to be able to tell you the name of a homeowner fro whom their plan worked, or even the name of the hedge fund, as if such a thing would be kept secret were it in any way true.
    And, of course, we’ve all heard about the forensic loan audit that is going to bring your bank to its knees for failing to do something for which the statute of limitations has expired years ago, or that requires you to get relief by refinancing and repaying your loan.
    Some of the scams out there are so far out there that’s it’s hard to believe that anyone would be sucked in… until you talk to a salesperson at one of these operations and that’s when you realize how good someone of these people are at getting you to believe their stories. If you weren’t a homeowner in a panic, you’d never buy any of this, but when it comes to losing a home, people will try anything. And that’s why the unintended consequence of SB 94, although I certainly wrote about what its passage would bring on numerous occasions, has not been to stop scammers, but more so it’s made them harder to find as they carefully crafted ways to charge homeowners outside the law.
    It;’s common sense really… laws only matter to law abiding people. Scammers don’t care about the laws… which is why they’re called scammers. I mean, when SB 94 was passed in California, thus making it illegal for a real estate licensed person to accept a fee for helping a homeowner get a loan modified, it was already illegal to rip someone off for three grand, wasn’t it? I’m not an attorney, but I’m pretty sure taking someone’s three grand and delivering nothing in return was always against the law.
    But what it did accomplish was to take all of the legitimate companies that were offering to help homeowners out of business because no one can work to get someone’s loan modified for God only knows how long the servicer takes to stop losing paperwork and actually look at someone’s file, and then send a bill for services… a year down the road… and even then hope that the homeowner isn’t so all-fire mad by then that they will actually pay the bill. And if someone doesn’t pay, what then? Ruin their credit? Come on now… let’s be adults about this… I pay my bills but I’m not even sure I’d pay that one a year down the road after being jerked around like chum on a line for months at a time.
    So, SB 94 took the legitimate providers out of the business and that includes hundreds or maybe even thousands of lawyers as well. The scammers… oh, they’re doing just fine, thank you very much.
    I recently taught a continuing education class, along with two attorneys, for the Orange County Bar Association. There must have been something close to 100 lawyers in attendance, but I was shocked when the room was asked how many were offering loan modification services and less than 20% put up their hands. Why were they there, I thought to myself, and then it became clear… none of them knew for sure how they were permitted to get paid by clients needing help with a loan modification.
    I’m sorry State of California, but if lawyers can’t figure out what a law allows and doesn’t… there’s a problem with the law. If travel agents weren’t sure how a new law affected them, well… that’s one thing, but an entire room full of licensed practicing attorneys? If they don’t know, who should know?
    The FTC’s recently enacted final MARS (“Mortgage Assistance Relief Services”) rule, for example, regulates all providers of loan modification services nationwide, and prevents such providers from charging homeowners before a loan modification has been offered by the servicer. But the FTC’s rule also allows for licensed attorneys to be exempt from that requirement, recognizing that without a retainer up front, an attorney could not offer to represent a homeowner seeking a loan modification. Under the new MARS rule, therefore, lawyers are allowed to charge a retainer up front, as long as that money is deposited in the attorney’s trust account and earned as services are rendered.
    You know… the way lawyers have always charged their clients for just about everything.
    SB 94 has made it much more likely for a homeowner to find a scammer because it has taken at least hundreds and perhaps even more legitimate lawyers out of offering the services related to a loan modification, while the scammers have just found ways to appear outside the law and therefore are that much harder to catch and shut down.
    Something has to be done and I’m going to take a shot at doing it. Stay tuned to Mandelman Matters for updates, and for more exposing of the scams that are turning up around every Internet search. We’re three plus years into this crisis and the government continues to fail at every turn and in every way when it comes to stopping or even slowing foreclosures. There’s just no excuse for this sort of thing to go on any longer, and I’m going to take a shot at both exposing and getting the State Bar to do something helpful. Because we need our lawyers to get us through this, and those lawyers need to know how they are permitted to practice in this area, just like the lawyers now do in the other 49 states.

  41. Guest22680991

    The Haffar Law Firm is investigating Tavy Dumont for professional misconduct in bringing forth untrue and overreaching legal claims on behalf of homeowners disgruntled with their specific lender or servicers. Many of the homeowners Ms. Dumont represents in her unjustified case against Haffar & Associates have misrepresented income, employment, and occupancy status with respect to home loan modification cases homeowners asked Haffar & Assocites to pursue.

    As a counter measure to the malicious and wildly exaggerated accusations proffered by Ms. Dumont, Haffar & Associates is now investigating all misrepresentations proffered by homeowners to Haffar & Associates so that Haffar & Associates could procure a modification case. “Many homeowners and lenders will be sued by Haffar & Associates due to their misrepresentations,” stated Mr. Haffar at a speaking engagement at the San Diego.

    “It is truly disheartening that our documented hard work, dedication, perseverance goes unappreciated but this is America and anybody, whether justified or not,” stated Mr. Haffar, Haffar & Assocites noted in lawsuit proferred by Ms. Dumont that they will be interpleading every single lender and servicer participating in the malicious case brought by Ms. Dumont. In addition, Haffar & Associates will be counter suing the majority if not all Plaintiff’s brought in her false case. Mr. Haffar stated, ” Its going to be a long and ugly battle, but the misconduct of the homeowner clients and lender/servicers will be brought to light!”

  42. Guest22680808

     The borrower just got his loan modified. I sent an email to Charlie about this previously. The borrower’s new MHA trial mod payments are slightly less than what the REST Report recommended but that was due to the lender not giving the borrower’s son’s contribution full credit so we had to rework the numbers. Bank of America had stated that this was a Fannie Mae REMIC Trust mortgage backed security and that they did not have the authorization from the Fannie Mae REMIC Trust to modify this loan via HAMP but once again BofA lied and they did this modification. The borrower had his payments cut in half and was 2 years past due. The borrower is very happy and I am sure will give us a good testimonial.

  43. Guest22680808

     Biased Coverage on Modification Crisi

    I work at a law office that advocates and represents homeowners in loan modification cases. However, the State Bar coverage regarding the modification crisis is very biased against attorneys attorneys. Why the last article written by James Towery is nothing short of a blanket indictment that all lawyers who try to help homeowners with loan modifications a crooks and scam artists.

    What about the attorneys who represent clients who are facing serious road blocks with banks (ie bank of america, jp morgan chase, wells fargo...)? Don't the attorneys working for the banks in their respective modification departments deserve the respective scrutiny from the California State Bar for misconduct, especially seeing how the modification departments of many banks do the following:

    1. Routinely lose paperwork submitted via fax, email and mail and ask for resubmission
    2. Send messages to homeowners that conflict with collections departments and other bank departments protocols
    3. Fail to comply with California civil code section 2924 et seq.

    Just as an example. I know at my firm many man hours have been spent working on clients modification cases but it does not stop them from contacting the state bar and making complaints. Many of those complaints are not created by the attorney but are created by the banks failing to comply with HAMP, FDIC and the banks internal disorganization. Where is their culpubality and why is the state bar not address that perspective in discussing attorney discipline matters?

    It is discouraging to see that the State Bar is only trying to protect the consumer and not the attorney as well. Their are two perspectives to every matter and I think James Towery needs to discuss the obvious bank failure and the pressure lawyers engaging in modifications go through

    Moreover, I think Mr. Towery needs to address the issue that successful modifications have been achieved as well.

    You have my two cents!

  44. Guest22674961

     u saved my home from foreclosure and saved me $1,000.00 on my mortgage payments, including prinicipal interest taxes and insurance. I was paying 2,500.00 per month and now I am only paying 1,500.00. Thank you Haffar & Associates and Mr. Haffar. I read all those bad reviews online and those negative reviews couldn't be further from the truth!

  45. Guest22674785

     

    I would just like to THANK ALL OF YOU!!!! for working so very hard on this on our behalf. THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU!!!!

  46. Guest22674785

     Thanks Thanks you did really gooooood job 

     

    thanks 

  47. Guest22674640

     I just got off the phone with Aurora today and they have approved our loan Mod. I just started crying over the phone!

    They will send us out the packet soon.

    I would just like to THANK ALL OF YOU!!!! for working so very hard on this on our behalf. THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU!!!!

    I will keep you posted as to when we get the packet from them. Merry Christmas to all of you. And again, thank you so very much.

  48. Guest22674640

     THANK YOU, THANK YOU. THIS SHOULD NOT NE SUCH A PROBLEM IT REALLY IS NOT ROCKET SCIENCE, BUT I DO APPRECIATE YOU GETTING ME THRU THIS, I TRULY AM GRATEFUL FOR YOUR WORK ON MY BEHALF.
    I DO FEEL HORRIBLE FOR THE PEOPLE WHO ARE LOSING THIS BATTLE WHEN THEY DON'T HAVE THE STRENGTH FOR THIS FIGHT AND HAVE NO ADVOCATE.
    GRATEFULLY YOURS,

  49. misha

     
    Dear Joshua,
    Thank you for the response. While I want to eliminate the LOC or at
    least get it reduced, with the knowledge that the credit score will be
    adversely affected, I need a little more time for research before we
    take another action.

    My goal is to move the property from my portfolio within a year. I
    may need to decide to tough it out and keep paying the LOC amount to
    preserve what credit score I have now, which I mentioned is 630 where
    I have some flexibility to purchase again.

    Let me read up on these things and I will get back to you.


    I do appreciate all that Haffar and Assoc has done on my behalf. If
    we go forward, I have lost all my patience with the banks and dealing
    with them, which is why Haffar's team was so valuable to me. I have
    such a bad taste in my mouth with the controls, dishonesty and
    avoidance tactics of the banks in our country that if I never have a
    conversation with Bank of America as long as I live, I would be very
    happy. I know you guys know how to deal with them.

    If you ever need any letters from me regarding your services, let me
    know. I would be happy to provide them to you. I am sorry for your
    troubles of late. Our world has gone a little crazy and people love a
    target.

    Sincerely,
     

  50. misha

     Thank you for the response. While I want to eliminate the LOC or at
    least get it reduced, with the knowledge that the credit score will be
    adversely affected, I need a little more time for research before we
    take another action.

  51. Guest22674487

     Haffar & Associates sent me this article and asked me to post to this website. I am a happy client..."

     

    You guys have lied so much that you don't think we realize that this is you, pathetic

    they really help allot of ppl please donot lie about truth it will be soon to all

  52. Guest22665749

    There are just too many complaints for all of them to be invalid. The best part about all this, Haffar and Associates will forever be tainted when anyone googles them. All the bad links concerning them are now permanent record and history for all to see for all of eternity. You cannot in this day and age, do people wrong and expect to not have to pay a price.

  53. Guest22575280

    Well lucky you, I have PROOF rest report and haffar are linked, including Associates that work at both places(one in tyhe same) also that they tried to make me LIE to help get me a loan mod, that I was able to get from the BANK myself without any of his UP-FRONT FEES. And lets hope he is at an address that he can actually be found at, cause there are some very PISSED off people that want to get their hands on him for STEALING their money. It is you who is full of **** and probably one of his ASSOCIATES. Nobody said he wasnt able to help some get a loan mod, only that there are many that he RIPPED-OFF you jackass. What do you think, all these people complaining just all of a sudden picked Haffar out of a hat and decided to go on the internet and WARN others of his fraudulant practices??, lololol nice try though.

  54. Guest22572465

    ok so i read this board when i was trying to find haffar and associates and i can't believe all the bullsh*t up here. if you have a case then go to arbitration! or file a lawsuit! anyways, I went to both 625 broadway and 10052 mesa ridge court per the BBB and haffar is now at 555 west beach in 92101. No relation to rest report matters at 10052 mesa. the 625 address is now a parking attendant for sunset parking and the 10052 mesa ridge court is a company called rest report matters and no i didn't see haffar and associates there or the parking place. i actually received a modification because of haffar and associates and couldn't reach them because i hadn't been in the country for over 3 weeks but when i returned they were not at the old address and my local number for my case manager wasn't working. Apparently haffar himself was not available but they did confirm he just moved in to 555 west beach in downtown and left forwarding address instructions and can be called up at 619.318.9324 or 877.696.6576 toll free for existing clients. His email and phone number haven't changed but their physical location has been reduced to one big location at 555 west beach in downtown and he is doing TV commercials as well as radio ads now for mods! apparently a congressman was convinced he was helpful to a constituent and haffar is aggressively defending himself against the haters because he is getting his job done despite the banks. i am another client who is thankful i was able to have help from him and his staff.

  55. Guest22570500

    Pete Meyers also is in the company directory if you call Rest Report Matters. The other Haffar Scam they are running. 877-737-8440 again, just like Haffar and associates, they NEVER answer the phone, have found 5 known Haffar employees (associates) in their company directory when I call. Don't take my word for it, check it out urself.

  56. Guest22570500

    Try finding them in San Diego at the address for Rest Report Matters (Their other scam they are running) 10052 Mesa Ridge Court, San Diego ca. 92126 Phone is 877-737-8440.....they are hiding there now. Good Luck hunting these criminals down.

  57. Guest22546139

    Do not hire Haffar and associates there a scam and appear to be commiting fraud. Check them out on the internet because there no longer at there office.

  58. Guest22507432

    http://www.complaintsboard.com/complaints/haffar-and-associates-loan-mod-c378050.html

    Victims galore, don't be a sucker, run from Haffar and Associates. they will steal your money

  59. Guest22507432

    http://www.yelp.com/biz/haffar-and-associates-a-p-c-san-diego

    enough said

  60. Guest22507432

    They are still scamming, I received a call yesterday from a kid from Rest Report Matters, wanting to know if I needed help with my Modification.

  61. Guest22495093

    To celebrate, the company first anniversary, Some commodities have been, discount .Anti-purchase at this site Any goods, we will giving a Christmas gift .In addition Buy $ 300 and receive a free glasses or a wallet, as a Christmas gift . welcome all friends to order. Reputation, quality, absolute guarantee. please log in: " fashionsb ".com . so what, move your mouse .

  62. Guest22165246

    Thats a very generous offer seeing how you have a class action lawsuit and criminal charges pending, lmao.

    If you are a victim of Haffar and Associates, read the whole thread below and there is info on how you can REALLY get your money back. DO NOT TRUST THIS CON ARTIST !! His word has proven to be for his own benefit. Don't be another one of his suckers.

  63. Guest22147790

    IF YOU FEEL YOU HAVE AN ISSUE WITH HAFFAR AND ASSOCIATES, MR. HAFFAR HAS OFFERED TO COVER THE $175.00 ARBITRATION FEE MENTIONED BELOW. YOU DO NOT HAVE TO PAY IT YOURSELF SINCE YOU ARE CLAIMING THAT YOU SHOULDN'T HAVE TO PAY ANOTHER PENNY BECAUSE YOU WERE RIPPED OFF. TO GET THIS STARTED, SEND A FAX TO 619-649-2524 WITH A COVER LETTER REQUESTING ARBITRATION AND  COPY OF THE RECEIPT FOR THE FUNDS PAID TO HAFFAR AND ASSOCIATES AND A BRIEF LETTER STATING YOU WANT TO ARBITRATE YOUR CASE. WITHIN 3-5 BUSINESS DAYS AFTER RECEIVING THIS LETTER, MR. HAFFAR'S LEGAL COUNSEL WILL CONTACT YOU TO COMPLETE THE ARBITRATION FILING. IF YOU HAVE YOUR CONTRACT, PLEASE INCLUDE THAT AS WELL AS THE BEST METHOD TO COMMUNICATE TO YOU. THIS IS A SINCERE OFFER AND IF YOU BELIEVE YOU ARE A "VICTIM" OF HAFFAR AND ASSOCIATES, WE WILL ARBITRATE YOUR CASE AND COVER THE COST SO THAT YOU CAN COME ON THIS POSTING SITE AND THEN ACTUALLY REVEAL YOURSELF AND LET EVERYONE KNOW THAT HAFFAR AND ASSOCIATES IS ATTEMPTING TO RESOLVE YOUR FEE DISPUTE. THANK YOU.

  64. Guest22112306

    Why do we need to pay another fee ($175.00) to arbitrate something that Haffar & Associates already agreed to pay? Stick with your word and pay what you owe!! STOP stealing people’s money!!!! Turn yourself in, STOP breaking the law!!!!!!!

  65. Guest22109476

    This is not about what the Banks should do haffar, its about if people should use you or not. Stop spamming long messages trying to cover up all the people you have wronged!!!

     

  66. Guest22109476

    This is not about what the naks should do haffar, its about if people should use you or not. Stop spamming long messages trying to cover up all the people you have wronged!!!

  67. Guest22097978

    THE BANKS SHOULD JUST GIVE THE MODIFICATIONS OUT LIKE THEY ARE SUPPOSED TO WHEN ITS CLEAR A MODIFICATION IS DESERVING. I'M NOT THE ONLY ONE WHO THINKS SO. IF YOU THINK HAFFAR AND ASSOCIATES STOLE ANYONE'S MONEY THEN GO AHEAD AND ARBITRATE IT OR FILE A LAWSUIT AND QUIT HIDING BEHIND THE HIDDEN POSTS UP HERE. READ ON AND TRY REALLY HARD NOT TO BE SO IGNORANT AND ACTUALLY LEARN SOMETHING NEW FOR A CHANGE.
    http://www.cnbc.com/id/40415970
    John Taylor: Foreclosures Are the Mortal Enemy to Economic Recovery
    By: Lori Ann LaRocco
    CNBC Sr. Talent Producer
    Monday, 29 Nov 2010 | 10:17 AM ET
    The foreclosure crisis still divides us into two camps. There are those who believe that foreclosing rapidly on homes subject to defaulted mortgages is vital to clearing the market. Others believe we should do everything we can to keep people in their homes, urging loan modifications to forestall foreclosures.
    John Taylor, President and CEO of the National Community Reinvestment Coalition, falls solidly in the latter camp. Taylor would like to see widespread mortgage modifications that would allow homeowners in danger of defaulting to keep their homes. Taylor is on the board of directors of the Rainbow/PUSH Coalition and the Leadership Conference for Civil Rights. He has also served on the Consumer Advisory Council of the Federal Reserve Bank Board, The Fannie Mae Housing Impact Division as well as The Freddie Mac Housing Advisory Board. He is extremely passionate on why his idea is the right choice to help turn around the real estate market.
    LL: There has been so much overleveraging in the real estate industry and lower interest rates can only help so much, what needs to get done with this new Congress looking at Financial Reform with Fannie and Freddie because they have not been address yet.
    JT: You are absolutely right. It's kind of like pumping plasma into a patient while the patient is still bleeding. We need to stanch the foreclosure crisis first. So the government has to get serious about this problem. The Administration’s voluntary approach to foreclosure prevention has probably done as much as it can possibly do, and even by their standards has not done enough.
    They have to step up the pressure now to achieve better results. The Federal Housing Administration (FHA) and Fannie and Freddie are the only securitizers in town now until the private market comes back; , they ought to be able to get banks and servicers willing to cooperate and modify these loans heading to foreclosure.
    It must be done. Because it is absolutely going to slow down any type of economic recovery if we have the eleven million more foreclosures projected by Wall Street analysts; if they go through, it’s going to triple the number of foreclosures we’ve experienced. How is that going to help the economy? So you have to put on the table the idea of taking as many of these troubled loans as possible and putting the homeowners in sustainable, modified loans, that are based on their ability to pay. Banks should have made these kinds of loans, which the homeowner could actually pay back, in the first place.
    LL: But what about the millions of people who purchased homes they could afford? Why should people be allowed to stay in homes they had no business buying in the first place, because they were way out of their price tag?
    JT: Was it a massive, malfeasant, greedy, lending industry that caused the problem or was it stupid consumers who should have known better? I think the evidence overwhelmingly supports the former conclusion. But that doesn't matter anymore; we don’t have time for that debate. The question now is what do we do to stop the foreclosures that are killing our economy by a thousand cuts, a hundred fold, every month.
    Foreclosures are the mortal enemy to economic recovery. We can keep on pumping money into the system to create liquidity for banks and in the market, but it’s simply not going to succeed until they plug the hole at the bottom of the well!
    So what has the Administration done to stem foreclosures? They have put in place a voluntary program, which has done roughly half a million permanent modifications since the program began, but there's been three and a half million foreclosures during the same time period and seven million foreclosure filings.
    That kind of performance earns merits a failing grade by any one's standards.
    So what do federal officials need to do? They need to stop carrying their hat in hand when dealing with Wall Street; The government can pound these guys, and they have all the leverage they need by merit of the fact that the banks can't do business without them. I hear people critical about the government’s role in the private lending sector; but without the government we don't have a housing market right now. Without the government there is no Fed window and bond issuance and the liquidity they create. Without the government there is no securitization. Wall Street isn't doing these things; there is almost no private label securitization happening.
    You know, all these banks are sitting on loans heading into foreclosure because the banks that hold the second liens are refusing to modify; the banks that hold the second liens are expecting the first lien holders will take the entire hit, and they’ll get paid out at 100%. Well these banks holding the second liens need to be taken to task, because they are holding up a lot of modifications.
    Also, what are Fannie and Freddie waiting for? The government holds tremendous regulatory authority over them; but government officials says they can’t tell them what to do, even though the government says no not really, Fannie and Freddie that they are just in conservatorship. and we can’t tell them what to do. That's just not true. The government is in the position to tell Fannie and Freddie to refinance hundreds of thousands of loans tomorrow, but Fannie and Freddie and the administration are looking at their bottom line so they are charging extra fees above the private market on anything that has any type of risk in it. Fannie and Freddie have not reduced the principal on one single mortgage.
    They have done half of what the banks are doing.We said from the beginning, to Secretary Paulson and then Geithner, that the foreclosure crisis can’t be resolved by the voluntary participation of the banks.
    You can't keep on sweetening the pie and expect them to do the right thing. The truth of the matter is that when push comes to shove the banks have no choice because the government has the ability to say to banks that if they want to do business with the government, including the Federal Reserve, FHA and the GSEs, they must cooperate and restructure these loans. If that had been done, some investors would have had to take some losses; but they are losing now at a very slow rate, prolonging the problem.
    The government should use the money they earned from TARP and purchase hundreds of thousands of loans at a discount—at a discount because they are not worth what they once were—and then recycle them into good, permanent, sustainable loans. Where people lost their jobs and can't afford their homes, other solutions are necessary. And abandoned properties should be foreclosed on and the properties should be put back on the market.
    But we’re not seeing practical solutions to the foreclosure crisis pursued. It seems to me people are just throwing up their arms, letting everything go down and saying if we don't get through all these foreclosures we will never see a bottom. I think its a terrible way to get through all this, and it will undermine our economy for years to come.
    LL: What you are proposing is extremely unpopular. How do you convince Americans this is the way to go to help the industry heal?
    JT: People have a right to be mad, but they shouldn’t be mad at 17 million plus homeowners that have either gone into foreclosure or are heading there. Seventeen million homeowners can’t all be stupid and greedy and wrong. The behavior of the industry is what changed; the financial services sector tricked and trapped these people, without the proper oversight to rein in their irresponsible lending practices.
    Should people have known better? Yes. But the industry was rigged to push through these loans and convince people they could afford to do it. But again, it’s too late to rehash these tired debates. If we do not respond to the foreclosure crisis now, we can guarantee the pain that will be felt by most of the people in this country. Families facing foreclosure don’t want a handout, they just want reasonable help. In fact, most of the people that got bad loans, perhaps 90 percent of them, are still paying on that sub-prime loan. Some of them have just simply fallen behind.
    If we don't do restructure their loans and keep people in their homes, property values will drop and everyone will be impacted who owns a home. We need to share the pain now, because otherwise it will affect us more broadly. Many people might think well, gee, if these homeowners had been smart they should have gotten the loan I got. Well that loan was not available to them because the system was rigged to push people into higher cost loans. Why? Because brokers and lenders got their fees and earnings that were connected to convincing people to take out more expensive mortgages with predatory terms and conditions. That's what was wrong.
    You can sit there and say the people should have known better, and call that the moral hazard. Or, you can recognize the real moral hazard here was allowing an industry to prepay upon a substantial portion of the home-owning public, to give them loans with terms and conditions the lenders knew were not sustainable.
    The moral dilemma then is do you put the burden on the people affected, while the banks are allowed to continue with their business? With the exception of investment products, when other other consumer product goes bad, the burden is put on the manufacturer, not the consumer.
    LL: Do you think the new congress will create good regulation laws?
    JT: The conservatives basically want to get rid of Fannie and Freddie, they don't want the competition for the private market. The Democrats are acting too timid.
    Congress has not shown that they are willing to push for all lenders to make responsible, sustainable loans to working-class people, and I’m not hopeful that this will change in the next Congress. People need loans for businesses, housing, other purposes, but they must be fair and sustainable loans, otherwise we get into trouble again. Expanding the Community Reinvestment Act would accomplish this goal, but too many members of Congress are too may be beholden to Wall Street to make that happen.
    LL: Do you think these two far extremely will be able to meet in the middle?
    JT: I think in the end, Fannie and Freddie will be different then they are today.
    They'll have considerably less market share. We ought to preserve their role in as a securitizer of affordable housing loans, but that remains to be seen. Hopefully that core aspect of Fannie and Freddie’s purpose will remain intact.
    LL: Where are we in the Fannie and Freddie put-back Tsunami?
    JT: This is a very astute question, and I'm really surprised more reporters are not focusing on this. This is the real issue that will force everyone to come to the table and I think that's a good thing. Fannie and Freddie are sending back bad loans; where they believe there was widespread fraud and abuse in the origination process. The GSEs have reps and warrants to be able to force the lenders to verify if they followed underwriting guidelines. If you acted fraudulently, then you ought to be responsible for any mortgage that is going bad.
    That's the way it’s supposed to work. That's also a protection for the taxpayers and investors.
    This is the same process that private label securitizers use. The private labels can also turn around and do the same thing, and there the problems are even more severe, because the private labels encouraged and purchased massive amounts of the no-document, low-document, verbally guarantee loans. These were the standards they created and accepted. So it’s difficult for them to go back to the lenders and say “you’re responsible for this now.”
    And there are other complicit parties. When things started to go sour, I went to one of the credit agencies, S&P, and they showed me one of the forms they used in their rating process. The lenders had to describe the nature of these loans, and on this particular document showed the y loans with low-documentation, no-documentation, piggyback second loans, Yield Spread Premiums, long prepayment penalties, balloon payments; in short, they had all those things that got everybody into trouble. It was all codified by the investment banks and the rating agencies. The problem was that the investors didn't know about this.
    LL: What inning are we in in this put-back tsunami?
    JT: To use your baseball metaphor, we are in the second inning of a nine-inning game, where all the pitchers are striking people out and no one is getting any hits. We can play this game out for another six to seven years with millions of foreclosures piling up and watch property values continue to deteriorate and unemployment go up, or we can grab the bull by the horn and get serious about this.
    The federal government must mandate that the private sector modify certain loans such that they match the borrowers ability-to-pay. Voluntary compliance simply has not and will not work. These new loans should match the incomes of the borrowers so that a responsible borrower has a sustainable loan. Those who have lost their jobs should be given a reasonable period to find suitable employment, and if unsuccessful, have the time to pursue other housing options.

  68. Guest22097978

    THE BANKS SHOULD JUST GIVE THE MODIFICATIONS OUT LIKE THEY ARE SUPPOSED TO WHEN ITS CLEAR A MODIFICATION IS DESERVING. I'M NOT THE ONLY ONE WHO THINKS SO. IF YOU THINK HAFFAR AND ASSOCIATES STOLE ANYONE'S MONEY THEN GO AHEAD AND ARBITRATE IT OR FILE A LAWSUIT AND QUIT HIDING BEHIND THE HIDDEN POSTS UP HERE. READ ON AND TRY REALLY HARD NOT TO BE SO IGNORANT AND ACTUALLY LEARN SOMETHING NEW FOR A CHANGE.
    http://www.cnbc.com/id/40415970
    John Taylor: Foreclosures Are the Mortal Enemy to Economic Recovery
    By: Lori Ann LaRocco
    CNBC Sr. Talent Producer
    Monday, 29 Nov 2010 | 10:17 AM ET
    The foreclosure crisis still divides us into two camps. There are those who believe that foreclosing rapidly on homes subject to defaulted mortgages is vital to clearing the market. Others believe we should do everything we can to keep people in their homes, urging loan modifications to forestall foreclosures.
    John Taylor, President and CEO of the National Community Reinvestment Coalition, falls solidly in the latter camp. Taylor would like to see widespread mortgage modifications that would allow homeowners in danger of defaulting to keep their homes. Taylor is on the board of directors of the Rainbow/PUSH Coalition and the Leadership Conference for Civil Rights. He has also served on the Consumer Advisory Council of the Federal Reserve Bank Board, The Fannie Mae Housing Impact Division as well as The Freddie Mac Housing Advisory Board. He is extremely passionate on why his idea is the right choice to help turn around the real estate market.
    LL: There has been so much overleveraging in the real estate industry and lower interest rates can only help so much, what needs to get done with this new Congress looking at Financial Reform with Fannie and Freddie because they have not been address yet.
    JT: You are absolutely right. It's kind of like pumping plasma into a patient while the patient is still bleeding. We need to stanch the foreclosure crisis first. So the government has to get serious about this problem. The Administration’s voluntary approach to foreclosure prevention has probably done as much as it can possibly do, and even by their standards has not done enough.
    They have to step up the pressure now to achieve better results. The Federal Housing Administration (FHA) and Fannie and Freddie are the only securitizers in town now until the private market comes back; , they ought to be able to get banks and servicers willing to cooperate and modify these loans heading to foreclosure.
    It must be done. Because it is absolutely going to slow down any type of economic recovery if we have the eleven million more foreclosures projected by Wall Street analysts; if they go through, it’s going to triple the number of foreclosures we’ve experienced. How is that going to help the economy? So you have to put on the table the idea of taking as many of these troubled loans as possible and putting the homeowners in sustainable, modified loans, that are based on their ability to pay. Banks should have made these kinds of loans, which the homeowner could actually pay back, in the first place.
    LL: But what about the millions of people who purchased homes they could afford? Why should people be allowed to stay in homes they had no business buying in the first place, because they were way out of their price tag?
    JT: Was it a massive, malfeasant, greedy, lending industry that caused the problem or was it stupid consumers who should have known better? I think the evidence overwhelmingly supports the former conclusion. But that doesn't matter anymore; we don’t have time for that debate. The question now is what do we do to stop the foreclosures that are killing our economy by a thousand cuts, a hundred fold, every month.
    Foreclosures are the mortal enemy to economic recovery. We can keep on pumping money into the system to create liquidity for banks and in the market, but it’s simply not going to succeed until they plug the hole at the bottom of the well!
    So what has the Administration done to stem foreclosures? They have put in place a voluntary program, which has done roughly half a million permanent modifications since the program began, but there's been three and a half million foreclosures during the same time period and seven million foreclosure filings.
    That kind of performance earns merits a failing grade by any one's standards.
    So what do federal officials need to do? They need to stop carrying their hat in hand when dealing with Wall Street; The government can pound these guys, and they have all the leverage they need by merit of the fact that the banks can't do business without them. I hear people critical about the government’s role in the private lending sector; but without the government we don't have a housing market right now. Without the government there is no Fed window and bond issuance and the liquidity they create. Without the government there is no securitization. Wall Street isn't doing these things; there is almost no private label securitization happening.
    You know, all these banks are sitting on loans heading into foreclosure because the banks that hold the second liens are refusing to modify; the banks that hold the second liens are expecting the first lien holders will take the entire hit, and they’ll get paid out at 100%. Well these banks holding the second liens need to be taken to task, because they are holding up a lot of modifications.
    Also, what are Fannie and Freddie waiting for? The government holds tremendous regulatory authority over them; but government officials says they can’t tell them what to do, even though the government says no not really, Fannie and Freddie that they are just in conservatorship. and we can’t tell them what to do. That's just not true. The government is in the position to tell Fannie and Freddie to refinance hundreds of thousands of loans tomorrow, but Fannie and Freddie and the administration are looking at their bottom line so they are charging extra fees above the private market on anything that has any type of risk in it. Fannie and Freddie have not reduced the principal on one single mortgage.
    They have done half of what the banks are doing.We said from the beginning, to Secretary Paulson and then Geithner, that the foreclosure crisis can’t be resolved by the voluntary participation of the banks.
    You can't keep on sweetening the pie and expect them to do the r