Question:

Where ca I Best all season tires for Mercedes E350 AWD in NH?

by Guest2222  |  11 years, 2 month(s) ago

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I live in NH, so I definitely will be driving in the snow! I am currently running Conti Extreme Contact, which are the stock tires. Not bad...but anyone tried anything better?

 Tags: AWD, CA, e350, Mercedes, NH, Season, tires

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4 ANSWERS

  1. Sash

     If you are looking for Mercedes e350 AWD winter season tires, i would suggest that a true winter tire is always better for snow conditions compared to an all-season tire.
    Put the winter tires on steel rims as it is both cheaper and New Hampshire uses a lot of road salt in the winter time, the salt won't eat away the finish on the more expensive alloy rims, thus saving your tires.

  2. Mitchel

    If you are looking for Mercedes tires that are best suited for winter season then a true winter tire is always better for snow conditions compared to an all-season tire. Manufacturers can't afford to make all season tires.
    It is better to have two sets of rims and tires. you can use one set of tires for summer, while the other set of tires can be used for winter. You can put the winter tires on steel rims as it is cheap.

  3. Guest19356848
    I have a similar E350 but mine is RWD and different size F/R tires. My OEM conti's can hydroplane like "panic" crazy at almost all speeds over 40. So my dealer (thanks Craig) suggested Michelin M X M 4, a GT All season tire. They were comp priced to replacement Conti's thru Tire Rack and I like them fine for summer, haven't had them in winter yet, and they don't hydro. You should look into these and I hope maybe this will help you out. "J"
  4. Guest373
    There is no such thing as "best" tire as best is very much subjective in this case. Many variables such dry handling, wet handling, hydroplaning resistance, snow handling, tread wear, cornering grip, tire noise, etc. etc. etc. Much of what determines best for someone is what order those priorities mentioned above are most important, and what type of terrain and road conditions will be travelled on. No one tire will cover all of those aspects better than all other tires so you need to figure out what is most important to you and determine which tire would best suit your needs.

    By the way, a true winter tire is always better for snow conditions compared to an all-season tire. Just keep in mind that the term "all-season tire" is really a compromise for tire manufacturers as they have to design a tire with rubber compounds and tread design for both conditions. However, many characteristics are at odds with each other. For example, in the winter, you want a narrow tire that helps cut through the snow for better traction but in the summer, a wider tire offers better grip and traction.

    My advice ( and I do this myself ) is to have two sets of rims and tires. One will be your summer set which can either be an all-season tire or if you want something a little more sporty and better handling, a summer/performance tire. The second set is a winter tire set. Put the winter tires on steel rims as it is both cheaper and if if NH uses a lot of road salt in the winter time, the salt won't eat away the finish on the more expensive alloy rims.

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