Question:

Air India Flight 182 Bomb Tests

by Guest22796808  |  9 years, 3 month(s) ago

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Can someone tell me about the details of explosives and clocks used in Air India Flight 182 to blast it? Please if someone has read report of it and know about this, then share it with us.

 Tags: 182, air, bomb, flight, India, tests

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  1. Airlines Expert
    By mid-May, Reyat had gone into the woods to test a device with 12v battery, cardboard cylinder, gun powder, some dynamite, but the device failed to work. Later, Reyat acquired between six and eight sticks of dynamite "to blow up unidentified stumps if need be in the future" from a Duncan well-driller after visiting his house to fix a truck, as well as a few blasting caps days later. On May 31, 1985, Reyat brought his timer attached to a "ghetto blaster" portable into his shop so that his fellow employee at Duncan Auto Marine Electric could help him fix it for a friend, but he returned the radio after it did not work properly. On June 4, Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) agents CSIS agent Larry Lowe and Lynn Macadams followed Parmar and a man identified only as "Mr. X" travel from Parmars house to the Horseshoe Bay Ferry Terminal, ride the Nanaimo-bound ferry, and visit Reyat at his home and shop at Auto Marine Electric. The three drove to a deserted bush area where Reyat was observed taking out an object into the woods. Staying out of sight, the agents, who did not bring a camera only heard an explosion which sounded like a gunshot. But later tests showed it could also be an explosion, and later searched turned up remants of aluminum blasting caps. J.S. Warren, director-general of counter-terrorism at CSIS on July 16, 1986 would later ask why they did not ask the police to stop and question the suspects, or search the vehicle which might have deterred the bombing plot. The next day on June 5, Reyat purchased a large Sanyo component tuner, model FMT 611K at Woolworths, and left his name and telephone number on the charge slip which was later found in a search of his home. Reyat also bought smokeless gunpowder from the sporting goods store, signing ". Reyat" on the explosives log. Study of bomb debris from Tokyo would eventually show the bomb was contained in a Sanyo tuner with a serial number matching a model sold only in British Columbia, used a Micronta clock as a timer which powered a relay with an Eveready 12-volt battery to trigger blasting caps which would set off a high-explosives consistent with sticks of dynamite, all matching items purchased by Reyat, which would lead to his eventual conviction. As late as 2010, Reyat admitted to only buying and assembling some parts, but denied he ever made a bomb, knowing what the bomb was to be used for, who was behind any plot, or that he ever asked or knew the name of the man who he said stayed in his house for week completing construction of the explosive device after his device failed. On June 9, 1985, a police informer in Hamilton reported that Parmar and Bagri had visited the Malton Sikh Temple, warning the faithful that "it would be unsafe" to fly Air India. Vancouver police also monitored militants 11 days before the bombing. A leader of the International Sikh Youth Federation companied that no Indian consuls or ambassadors had yet been killed, but the response was: "You will see. something will be done in two weeks" TWA Flight 847 was hijacked June 14 by Shiite Muslim extremists, starting a 17 day ordeal ending in Beirut when a crewmember was killed and dumped on the tarmac. By mid-May, Reyat had gone into the woods to test a device with 12v battery, cardboard cylinder, gun powder, some dynamite, but the device failed to work. Later, Reyat acquired between six and eight sticks of dynamite "to blow up unidentified stumps if need be in the future" from a Duncan well-driller after visiting his house to fix a truck, as well as a few blasting caps days later. On May 31, 1985, Reyat brought his timer attached to a "ghetto blaster" portable into his shop so that his fellow employee at Duncan Auto Marine Electric could help him fix it for a friend, but he returned the radio after it did not work properly. On June 4, Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) agents CSIS agent Larry Lowe and Lynn Macadams followed Parmar and a man identified only as "Mr. X" travel from Parmars house to the Horseshoe Bay Ferry Terminal, ride the Nanaimo-bound ferry, and visit Reyat at his home and shop at Auto Marine Electric. The three drove to a deserted bush area where Reyat was observed taking out an object into the woods. Staying out of sight, the agents, who did not bring a camera only heard an explosion which sounded like a gunshot. But later tests showed it could also be an explosion, and later searched turned up remants of aluminum blasting caps. J.S. Warren, director-general of counter-terrorism at CSIS on July 16, 1986 would later ask why they did not ask the police to stop and question the suspects, or search the vehicle which might have deterred the bombing plot. The next day on June 5, Reyat purchased a large Sanyo component tuner, model FMT 611K at Woolworths, and left his name and telephone number on the charge slip which was later found in a search of his home. Reyat also bought smokeless gunpowder from the sporting goods store, signing ". Reyat" on the explosives log. Study of bomb debris from Tokyo would eventually show the bomb was contained in a Sanyo tuner with a serial number matching a model sold only in British Columbia, used a Micronta clock as a timer which powered a relay with an Eveready 12-volt battery to trigger blasting caps which would set off a high-explosives consistent with sticks of dynamite, all matching items purchased by Reyat, which would lead to his eventual conviction. As late as 2010, Reyat admitted to only buying and assembling some parts, but denied he ever made a bomb, knowing what the bomb was to be used for, who was behind any plot, or that he ever asked or knew the name of the man who he said stayed in his house for week completing construction of the explosive device after his device failed. On June 9, 1985, a police informer in Hamilton reported that Parmar and Bagri had visited the Malton Sikh Temple, warning the faithful that "it would be unsafe" to fly Air India. Vancouver police also monitored militants 11 days before the bombing. A leader of the International Sikh Youth Federation companied that no Indian consuls or ambassadors had yet been killed, but the response was: "You will see. something will be done in two weeks" TWA Flight 847 was hijacked June 14 by Shiite Muslim extremists, starting a 17 day ordeal ending in Beirut when a crewmember was killed and dumped on the tarmac.

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