Question:

74 basic gymnastics positions

by Guest12219475  |  4 years, 10 month(s) ago

1 LIKES UnLike

74 basic gymnastics positions

 Tags: 74, Basic, gymnastics, positions

   Report

1 ANSWERS

  1. Ali Abdullah
    Hi There, Gymnastics is a sport involving the performance of sequences of movements requiring physical strength, flexibility, and kinesthetic awareness, such as handspring s and handstand s. It developed from fitness exercises used by ancient Greek soldiers, including skills for mounting and dismounting a horse, and circus performance skills. It is often considered a dangerous sport, as the difficult acrobatic maneuvers often performed on equipment high above the ground puts the athlete at risk of serious injury. Modern gymnastics, as regulated by the Fédération Internationale de Gymnastique incorporates six distinct disciplines: Artistic gymnastics (further classified as MAG and WAG) Rhythmic gymnastics Sports aerobics Sports acrobatics Trampolining General gymnastics Of these disciplines, the two sub-disciplines of artistic and rhythmic gymnastics are the best known, having been part of Summer Olympic Games competitions. Trampoline was also recently included in the Summer Olympics. The discipline of rhythmic gymnastics is competed only by women (although there is a new version of this discipline for men being pioneered in Japan , see Men's rhythmic gymnastics ), and involves the performance of five separate routines with the use of five apparatus - ball, ribbon, hoop, clubs, rope - on a floor area, with a much greater emphasis on the aesthetic rather than the acrobatic. Rhythmic routines are scored out of a possible 20 points. Sports aerobics involves the performance of routines by individuals or pairs, emphasizing strength, flexibility, and aerobic fitness rather than acrobatic or balance skills. Routines are performed on a small floor area and generally last 60-90 seconds, being judged out of a total of 10 points. Trampolining routines involve a build-up phase during which the gymnast jumps repeatedly to achieve height, followed by a sequence of ten leaps without pauses during which the gymnast performs a sequence of aerial tumbling skills. Routines are marked out of a maximum score of 10 points. Additional points (with no maximum) can be earned depending on the difficulty of the moves. General gymnastics , sometimes called group gymnastics, enables people of all ages and abilities to participate in performance troupes of 6 to more than 150 athletes. They perform synchronized, choreographed routines. Troupes may be all one gender or mixed. There are no age divisions in general gymnastics. The largest general gymnastics exhibition is the quadrennial World Gymnaestrada which was first held in 1939 . Artistic Gymnastics Artistic Gymnastics is usually divided into Men's (MAG) and Women's Gymnastics (WAG), each group doing different events; Men compete on Vault, Parallel Bars, the Pommel Horse, the Rings, the High Bar, and on the Floor, while women compete on Floor, Uneven Bars, Vault, and Beam. Though routines performed on each event may be short, they are physically exhausting and push the gymnast's strength, flexibility, endurance, and awareness to the limit. WAG Vault - Gymnasts sprint down a runway, usually about 75 feet long, before leaping on a springboard and holding their bodies straight while punching (blocking using only a shoulder movement) the vault and flipping over to a standing position. In advanced gymnastics, twists are added before landing. Uneven Bars - Women competing on this event must hold themselves in a series of dares while leaping and even flying between two bars. Beam - The balance beam is an event which pushes balance, awareness especially. The beam itself is about 125cm high, 5m long, and 10cm wide. Routines include tumbling, turns, upside down feats, and a leap series. Floor - The floor is a carpeted area, 12m x 12m, usually springed. Gymnasts perform a series of tumbling and dance moves to music in a routine that lasts between 60-90 seconds. MAG Floor - The floor is a carpeted area, 12m x 12m, usually springed. Men perform a series of tumbling passes along with flexibility, strength, and balance tests. Routines last between 50-70 seconds and are performed without music. Pommel Horse - Men must perform circular movements around the horse with their legs while allowing only their hands to actually touch it. this is considered one of the hardest events. Rings - The rings are about 8 feet off the ground. Men must have good strength and flexibility to swing themselves on these rings while preventing the rings themselves from swinging. The rings are the epitome of male gymnast strength. Vault - Gymnasts sprint down a runway, usually about 75 feet long, before leaping on a springboard and holding their bodies straight while punching (blocking using only a shoulder movement) the vault and flipping over to a standing position. In advanced gymnastics, twists are added before landing. Parallel Bars - Men hold themselves on two bars about a shoulder's width apart and about 6 1/2 feet high while performing a series of swings and balances that require great strength and coordination. High Bar - a 1-inch thick steel bar 8 feet in the air is all the gymnast has to hold onto as he shows swings, release skills, twists, and even a change of direction

Question Stats

Latest activity: 4 years, 10 month(s) ago.
This question has been viewed 2360 times and has 1 answers.

BECOME A GUIDE

Share your knowledge and help people by answering questions.
Unanswered Questions